WHY?

A Simple Question … Endless Possibilities

Posts Tagged ‘humor’

Why Drive in The Right, Pass in the Left Lane?

Posted by apwood on September 12, 2008

For one – it would make so many people happy.  At least me.

Why do I care?  Almost daily I see someone going right at or below the speed limit in the left lane.  It starts to back traffic up and you have to take off cruise control.  (No, I’m not a road rager (is that a word?) who drives 90 mph, just your normal 7-miles-or-so-over-the-speed-limit-girl)

Also, my other half is an offender of left-lane-driving-slower-than-the-cars-in-the-right-lane.  He is one of the many who do this. I try to bite my tongue when someone is on his ass and I just know they’re irritated.  If he doesn’t notice after a minute or so i just can’t help it.

I don’t understand why nor do i understand why I don’t and why it bugs me?  I just feel like it is the right thing to do as a driver.

But anyway, curiosity pushed me to look up what the ‘law’ on such annoying behavior is.  It must have come from somewhere.  Didn’t I learn that in Driver’s Ed in high school?  Stay to the right unless passing?  It has been a while so I did some searching.

First I found a site called “STATE KEEP RIGHT LAWS” – it actually breaks down the laws each state.  Yeah, LAWS as in plural.  It is ridiculous some say YES you have to keep right, others say NO, others say sometimes depending.  Take a look at the chart – beware, it can be confusing – you have to keep looking up to remember which color means which answer and then the side notes.  (or maybe it is just early for me).

So, the verdict on Pennsylvania (since that is where i live and drive most often) – “USUALLY”.  Huh?  Not Yes (although marked green for yes = driver can only use left lane to pass)  Usually was given b/c it is a YES with 2 reasons for not following this:

May also use left lane to allow traffic to merge or “when traveling at a speed greater than the traffic flow”.

I get it they are being very specific – which some may need and not leaving it to common sense.  Very smart PA lawmakers that be.

But  there are only seven states that say Yes to drive in the right lane unless passing.

The abundance of them say ‘Slower’ on the chart which means –

Most states follow the Uniform Vehicle Code and require drivers to keep right if they are going slower than the normal speed of traffic (regardless of the speed limit). These are listed as “slower”, with an asterisk and an explanation under “comments” if vehicles lawfully using the left lane must yield to overtaking traffic. A few states either do not require vehicles to keep right (“no”), or permit vehicles moving at the speed limit to drive in the left lane regardless of traffic conditions .

Which I interpret as if you are holding up traffic because you are going slower than the people in the right lane or behind you move over.

Only a few states don’t say you have to get over.

So I wasn’t crazy – Stay in the right lane unless you are passing or going faster than the right lane.

I even found a site called DRIVE RIGHT PASS LEFT – where they also hold the belief that this system has a place and will help with congestion on the highways.  I didn’t scour it as closely as the first as I’m out of time.  Woke up a little early this morning and had a minute.

Am I the only one who wishes this was a law that more abide by?

Although – this was kind of just a fun thing to look up for curiosity sake on what the laws were.

Have a good one!

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Posted in Curiosity | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Why Can You Be ‘discombobulated’ But Not ‘combobulated’?

Posted by apwood on January 17, 2008

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For some reason I’ve always enjoyed using the word discombobulated when I just couldn’t get it together. It’s a fun word. However, my new trying-to-be-and-use-positive-words-only take has led me to ponder why it is possible to be ‘discombobulated’ and not ‘combobulated.’

While waiting for my turn with my incredible chiropractor (Dr. Janet McGaurn in West Chester, PA) she told me she would be right with me, she was getting combobulated. I in turn remarked that I liked that as it was the positive alternative to one of my former favorite words ‘discombobulated.’

She informed me that it wasn’t actually a word in the dictionary. Of course, I wondered WHY would there be a negative version of a word without the opposite positive option (when it was only made negative with the prefix ‘dis’)???

Well, that made me take a look at the dictionary.

**American Heritage DictionaryCite This Sourcedis·com·bob·u·late (dĭs’kəm-bŏb’yə-lāt’)
tr.v. dis·com·bob·u·lat·ed, dis·com·bob·u·lat·ing, dis·com·bob·u·lates
To throw into a state of confusion. See Synonyms at confuse.

[Perhaps alteration of discompose.]

Well the alteration discompose…… the opposite is compose. So why not combobulated? It does sound a little strange but is that just because I’m used to “dis” or because it is positive. Not sure.

Now ‘dis‘ –

** Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1)Cite This SourceDis [dis] Pronunciation KeyShow IPA Pronunciation –noun Classical Mythology. a god of the underworld.

Did he invent the word?

also-

**American Heritage Stedman’s Medical DictionaryCite This Sourcedis-
pref.

  1. Not: disjugate.
  2. Absence of; opposite of: disorientation.
  3. Undo; do the opposite of: dislocate.
  4. Deprive of; remove: dismember.

**No results found for combobulated.

So if it can have a ‘dis’ on it why can’t we remove it? Or do I have to hang up my beloved discombobulated since there isn’t a positive alternative?

Yes, it may not be important to some maybe even most people – i just wanted to know why? go figure…

Also adding to this discussion – Kate – informed me that the same is true for the word “nonplussed.”

**Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1)Cite This Source

[non-pluhs, non-pluhs] Pronunciation KeyShow IPA Pronunciation verb, -plussed or -plused, -plus·sing or -plus·ing, noun –verb (used with object)

1. to render utterly perplexed; puzzle completely.

Well I guess I’m nonplussed about why?

I won’t go there why nonplussed means puzzled when the ‘non’ usually means not.

Oh well, Anyone?

Thanks Janet & Kate!

Posted in Word Play | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 46 Comments »